Just found out you're pregnant?

Here's what to do next...

Self-referral service for Lancashire Teaching Hospitals ( Includes Royal Preston Hospital and Chorley and South Ribble Hospital)

As soon as you find out you are pregnant you have the option to book your maternity care directly with Lancashire teaching Hospitals instead of seeing your GP; we encourage you to do this as soon as possible so you can see your midwife and have your early screening tests.

Note: Questions marked by * are mandatory

Please answer the questions as fully as possible as this will enable us to ensure you receive the most appropriate care.

When you submit the form our booking team will arrange your first booking appointment and also notify your GP of your pregnancy. Your first booking appointment will be sent to you via the email address you provide.

It is now routine practice for women to be seen on their own for the first 10 minutes of their appointment

Your booking appointment will between 9-11 weeks of pregnancy.

If you do not receive an appointment within three  weeks then please call us on 01772 524726

Folic Acid:

If you are not already taking a folic acid supplement you should start taking this straight away (400mcg/day). This should ideally be started three months before getting pregnant and continued for the first 12 weeks. This will help to protect against certain rare abnormalities.

Food hygiene and food-acquired infections:

We advise you only to drink pasteurised milk. Avoid cheeses such as camembert, brie and blue vein cheese. Avoid all pates, uncooked or undercooked ready prepared meals. https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/pregnancy-and-baby/healthy-pregnancy-diet/

Diet:

Having a healthy and nutritious diet in pregnant is really important as your baby relies on your to provide the right balance of nutrients to help them grow and develop.

Smoking:

Stopping smoking will help both you and your baby immediately. Harmful gases, such as carbon monoxide, and other damaging chemicals will clear from your body. Visit https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/pregnancy-and-baby/smoking-pregnant/ to find out the benefits to you and your baby when you stop smoking.

Alcohol:

It’s safer not to drink any alcohol if you’re pregnant, or planning to become pregnant, because it can damage your growing baby. By not drinking, you are protecting your baby and minimising the risks to their development and future health.

Medication:

Before taking any medicine when you're pregnant, including painkillers, check with your pharmacist, midwife or GP that it's suitable. https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/pregnancy-and-baby/medicines-in-pregnancy/

Exercise:

The more active and fit you are during pregnancy, the easier it will be for you to adapt to your changing shape and weight gain. It will also help you to cope with labour and get back into shape after the birth. https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/pregnancy-and-baby/pregnancy-exercise/

Self referral form

Note: Questions marked by * are mandatory


Birth Location Preference





About You










GP Surgery Details
Current Pregnancy Information
Previous Pregnancy Information


  Yes No
Were any of your children born before 34 weeks gestation?
Have you had any miscarriages?
If yes, have you have experienced 3 or more miscarriages in a row?
Medical History
  Yes No
Do you have diabetes?
Do you have epilepsy?
Do you have mental health problems?
Have you experienced a blood clot in your leg or lungs e.g. DVT
Have you experienced ectopic pregnancy
Do you have Renal (kidney) disease?
Do you have a respiratory (breathing) disease such as severe asthma?
Do you have heart disease?
Do you have a blood disorder?
Do you have an auto-immune disease?
Do you have high blood pressure?
BadgerNet and Maternity Notes