Catherine Roberts

Catherine Roberts Job Title: Consultant in Critical Care and Emergency Medicine

Department: Critical Care

Telephone Number: 01772 522555

Primary Medical Qualification: MB ChB 2002 University of Manchester

Other Qualifications: Fellow of the College of Emergency Medicine  FCEM, Fellow of the Faculty of Intensive Care Medicine FFICM,
Member of the Royal College of Physicians MRCP(UK)

Year of Registration: 2002

GMC Number: 6053120

Career History: Qualified from Manchester University in 2002 and after a brief period of training in Leeds, completed higher specialist training in Emergency Medicine and Intensive Care in the North West region. Appointed as a Consultant in Emergency Medicine and Critical Care at Lancashire Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust in March 2012 and currently works across both departments.

Specialist Areas: Critical care medicine including neurocritical care

Specialists Interests: Neurocritical care, Trauma, Sepsis

Research Interests: Involved in several national and international research projects which are being undertaken on the critical care unit.

Clinics: Emergency department follow up clinic

Languages Spoken: English

 

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Improving patient experience for critically ill patients

Improving patient experience for critically ill patients

Lancashire Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust is introducing an exciting and innovative new project to its hospitals in order to improve patient experience, which is the first of its kind in Lancashire.

ICU-Hear is an initiative which offers live music to critically ill patients on the intensive care unit in hospital, provided by a charity group called Music in Hospitals and Care. The aim of this initiative is to provide a soothing, relaxing, calming and even uplifting atmosphere for patients who are critically ill in hospital. The music aims to make the critical care unit less clinical and provide a calming ambience for patients.

The music is played live rather than just being played on the radio or another platform to enable the musicians to alter their tone or pace accordingly in response to the behaviour of the patient.

The initiative was started by a former ICU patient at Manchester Royal Infirmary at a regional support group for former ICU patients. This has now been trialled in multiple hospitals nationwide.

Catherine Roberts, Consultant in Emergency Medicine and Critical Care at Lancashire Teaching Hospitals, has introduced this concept into Royal Preston Hospital and has led the organisation of the launch event.

The launch event will take place on Wednesday 3rd October at 3pm on the Intensive Care Unit at Royal Preston Hospital with a lady called Holly Marland playing the kora (African harp) for patients. This session has been funded from the Governor Patient Experience Charitable Fund.

Catherine said: “ICU Hear has only been launched in a couple of hospitals so far, and we are excited to be the first in Lancashire to be offering this fantastic service. Being in our Intensive Care Unit can be an extremely scary, daunting and unnerving experience, and we always aim to do anything that we can to try to help our patients to feel more comfortable.”

“It has been proven that music can help people to sleep better and also to reduce pain so we hope that this service will benefit our patients and improve their experiences of being in hospital.”